Tag Archives: marriage

The Greenlight Project has a Father’s Day Conversation

A father-daughter relationship is like none other.  For many years the lack of fatherly love has become an epidemic in our society.  Mothers are taking on the role of being both parents, but there is no comparison to the male influence.  Author Alicia Michelle Morgan expresses her thoughts and personal feelings about the relationship with her father in their book, Father and Daughter Time: Conversations from the Heart.

Alicia Michelle Morgan was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. This Louisiana native is as unique in substance as the flavorful combinations in a pot of gumbo.  Alicia may be somewhat quiet in demeanor but no one will argue that a little sassiness is a subtle part of this Southern girl’s darling personality.

A graduate of Tuskegee University and New Mexico State University with degrees in engineering it’s hard to imagine at first glance an introspective and outside the box thinker lies beneath. The birth of the pen name A.M. Morgan is the outer extension of an inner voice taking on a new world where an appreciation for the creative and performing arts takes center stage.

A multi-faceted woman on a mission to turn literary passions into a fulfilling career A.M. Morgan will not stop until the ambitions of this writer with a little business savvy is the foundation of the successful brand 3 Morgan Publishing. 3 Morgan Publishing is the birth of a family dream in which the extraordinary gift of writing will provide insightful words to spark engaging conversations.

D. Lester Morgan, co-author of the book, Father and Daughter Time: Conversations from the Heart, is the father of author A.M. Morgan. With one of his favorite quotes being, “It’s not how long you live but the quality of life that you have while you are here,” you have to acknowledge the fact that this individual lives everyday to the fullest! The intellectual level of Mr. Morgan and his daughter A.M. Morgan is truly impactful to followers of their work.

D. Lester Morgan is a Slidell Louisiana native who is a country boy at heart who enjoys living the simple life.  He believes that in order to develop holistically one has to be mentally and physically fit. As part of that development he reads regularly and runs 5-10 miles daily. He received a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Secondary Education with a History Minor from Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

This is only the beginning of a story that starts on an unpaved road with an unyielding faith and commitment to reach its final destination. It is with great pleasure and joy to see the manifestation of lifelong dreams becoming a reality through the voices of A.M. Morgan, D. Lester Morgan and JL Morgan.

The time to praise and truly appreciate our fathers is coming soon, June 20th, so in order to hear the voices and conversations amongst A.M. Morgan and her father D. Lester Morgan, listen to The Greenlight Project on tomorrow, Friday June 17th at 11am EST.  I can assure you that you will want to miss this. In addition to tuning in, you should pick up her book at the nearest bookstore, Amazon.com or at her site www.ammorgan.net : Father and Daughter Time: Conversations from the Heart.

Diverse Moves in Media: Rochelle Valsaint

Marketers, Agencies Seek on-the-Ground Support in Fast-Growing Ghana, Nigeria and Angola

Posted by Rupal Parekh on 06.14.10NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — When WPP’s Ogilvy & Mather struck a deal in late April with global communications group Scangroup Limited, it was a clear sign that the world’s-largest holding company has officially set its sights on advertising’s last frontier: Africa.

“Increasingly, Africa is the continent of opportunity, rather than war, disease and poverty,” the company, which has spent the last two decades conquering Asian markets, wrote in its last annual report. Indeed, Miles Young, Global CEO of Ogilvy & Mather, said that with many African countries developing middle classes, “they are assuming the characteristics of Latin America and Asia as they were 20 years ago.”

By BlackCanseco | DIAMOND BAR, CA

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Weekly Dish

  • Diddy’s Questionable Parenting Skills – Tamika believes it’s irresponsible, Rochelle believes it’s his money to use how he’s pleased in the lives of his children.  What do you think?
  • An article in The Atlanta Post, in celebration of African football – Talks about the Top 8 Highest Paid Black or African-Heritage Soccer Stars At The World Cup whose drive and dedication to the sport have made the 2010 World Cup in South Africa possible. Tamika says it’s some pretty pieces of beautiful chocolate ‘foreign’ eye candy, take a look!
  • The President addressed the oil spill from the Oval Office earlier this week.  He called it the ‘Worst Environmental Disaster’ U.S. Has Ever Faced. Our friends over at The Root.com shared this article . Take a read and tell us if you agree with The President’s mandate to have BP finance a 3rd party required to compensate the workers and business owners who have been harmed as a result of his company’s recklessness. And this fund will not be controlled by BP. The Greenlight Project gives Mr. President 2 green thumps up, do you agree?

Thank you for listening and tune in next week!  Happy Father’s Day Father’s & Have a Great Weekend!

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Unleashing the Baggage

By: Tamika L. Morrison

Ever listen to the lyrics of Erykah Badu’s ‘Bag Lady’? She says:

Bag Lady

Bag lady you gone miss your bus
You can’t hurry up
Cause you got too much stuff
When they see you comin
[They Just] take off runnin

From you it’s true oh yes they do

Boy, don’t we all carry a heavy load – men and women!  In this fallen world I’ve learned the wounds of living a life that gives you wisdom, experience and success rarely ever – if ever – will protect you from the pains that’s part of obtaining all that ‘good stuff’ I just mentioned.  I never realized it also required me to learn those other benefits like forgiveness, moving on to the next and just letting it go <– the latter is what I often find the most difficult to do and so, my baggage gets heavier.  You know what I’m talking about?

As Badu’s lyrics so eloquently warn, “One day all them bags gone get in your way”. To make sure you got that, I made the last sentence in larger letters on purpose *wink*.  And trust, that day may come as unexpected and unwelcome as all the other curve balls life put in our path – but you don’t have to be caught off guard.  I’m one that embraces the idea – as often as I need – of seeking an objective viewpoint.  For those of you still lost – I mean, seeking out a therapist.  I have sought the help of a trusted therapist in the past and when I need a little help getting over the hump or spring cleaning my proverbial closet when it gets too daunting to tackle on my own, I dial-up my therapist!

Some of us believe that we’re ‘strong enough’, ‘wise enough’, ‘smart enough’ to figure it all out – I’m with you!  But, I also know when things just get a little too convoluted in my quest to understand, forgive, recall, forgive, re-live, forgive, hurt again, forgive – normally that only equates to me going into fierce protection mode which looks like: anger, defensiveness, attitudinal mood swings and maybe actual swings if I don’t get that objective viewpoint soon enough!

So, in the spirit of Badu’s ‘Bag Lady’, I encourage us all to clean up those closets when they very apparently call you to do so and pack light – you don’t want to miss your train or plane to your desired destination (marriage, career advancement, career fulfillment, friends/relationships, vacations, etc.) because you had too much of a load.

UNLEASH THE BAGGAGE!

Until next time,

Peace….

Follow me @twsprfirm

Loving Me. Establishing a truce as Ms. Good and Plenty

By: Rochelle Valsaint

Rochelle (third from left) and her sisters

There are five things that keep my attention  – my marriage, motherhood, my ambition (as it relates to financial security now and in leaving a legacy), my family and  my weight/my body image and how it makes me feel about my presentation to the world. Well, that last one, my weight, has been heavy on my mind over the last week. Starting with a mention I made of myself as Ms. Good and Plenty on our weekly  blog talk radio show, The Greenlight Project Vogue, I playfully referred to my plus-sized figure. Publicly I chuckled because I really liked the name and though myself clever just for coming up with it. Privately, I knew it was a small declaration of acceptance that while body image has been and is a life issue for me, it is ok to publicly acknowledge the beauty of all of me at whatever size.

You see, I had an aha! moment several years and Oprah sessions ago that my weight and body issues started at a young age. My body issues come from a combination of Momma issues, Daddy issues, generational issues, etc. And, although I have accepted that I will have to deal with these issues, whenever they arise throughout my life, I commit today to a few things that will help me keep a truce with myself regarding my body image. First, I am giving up on a few self-sabotaging things. Namely, (1) I will stop referring to myself as the ‘smart’ sibling in reference to my place amongst my Mama’s three girls. This is important to do because I know this a sly critique of myself – having always wanted to be ‘the fine one’ as I refer to my oldest sister, Staci; or referring to my youngest sister, Akia as ‘the pretty one.’ As of today, we are all each one of the descriptions and so much more if I’m the person telling the story. (2) I will stop avoiding full body mirrors and only seeing what I consider my flaws when I look at myself – my arms, my ample thighs and my stomach. And (3), I will stop encouraging people to take pictures of me from the face up!

The plan is to replace those bad habits with a few, self-affirming ones that will allow me to walk in the light to which I have been gifted. (1) I will continually invest in the wardrobe, shoes, accessories and beauty enhancing solutions that celebrate all of my beauty. For pointers, I will look to Afrobella, and Vogue Italia’s, Vogue Curvy to help me keep this commitment (See fellow Domer, Julie Henderson, a perfect role model). (2) I will work toward a photo shoot for me that captures the model I am when I am feelin’ my stylo. If any stylists and photographers or connections that want to help me achieve this goal, reach out to me. And (3), I will boldly put myself in the spotlight through the media channels we are creating with the TWS Media division. I will also celebrate those companies and media that get that it’s a thin line between working toward the healthy lifestyle while celebrating yourself and self-sabotaging with negative motivation, which never works as well.

Today I accept that I am ‘Perfect in My Imperfection!’

I am sure that I am not the only one who needs to make that truce with themselves today. If anyone else knows about this ; or wants to support my effort, let a sister know.

The State of Family & Marriage in the Black Community

By: Tamika L. Morrison

Let me start of by saying, “I am a single black woman, never married”, but I do desire and believe in family and marriage.  It has been widely reported, speculated and even breaking news in some arenas that black women are not marrying as often as or quickly as their Latina, White, Asian, Indian, Chinese and other varieties of ‘Anglo-Saxon’ counterparts.  As a matter of fact, Forty-two-percent of black women have never been married, compared to 21% of white women, according to national statistics. Within the last two generations, marriage rates for African-Americans have dropped significantly. Between 1970 and 2001, the black marriage rate dropped by 34 percent, compared to 17 percent in the general population. African-American women are also the least likely group to get married in the United States. And if they (black women) wed an African-American man, those couples have the highest divorce rate in the United States.  Is this a stereotype or is this reality?  Well, I can only speak from my own experience.

My parents never married – each other, but both of them are married today – to different spouses who are black.  That said, since I came from a single-parent home I have conflicting views at times on love and marriage from a black woman’s perspective but I was given the chance to witness what life is like in a two-parent household via friends that lived such a life.  Although I ached deeply for my dad’s constant presence in my home, I was also equally relieved he and my mother never married, simply because they weren’t compatible.  Even still, I and many of my friends suffered from what’s called “daddy issues” and when you compare those of us with “daddy issues” with my friends who actually grew up with their father, I must admit there is a remarked difference in how we feel about love and marriage. I personally am terrified that it won’t last until death do us part. Nevertheless, I will not allow this fear to stay in the way of what I desire for myself and my future family.

That brings me to two things – On April 2nd, Tyler Perry’s coveted sequel, “Why Did I Get Married Too?” will be released and will reunite four couples that deal with life-altering situations and common relationship issues to most couple – regardless of race – fidelity, trust, forgiveness and love.  Personally, I appreciate Perry humanizing the ‘black love experience’ by showing in his films – yes, we do still get married to each other and yes, our relationship issues are not uncommon to those of other races. It also helps to put to rest the media’s obsession with stereotyping what’s been dubbed, “The State of the Single Black Female”.  I’ve read and heard the movie reviews and many applaud Tyler’s sequel depicting Black love and marriage, congratulating the characters for showing depth in their respective interpretations and even the appreciation for some of the exaggeration in classic Perry style. I second the motion by praising Perry for giving Black love some positive PR.

There’s been a lot going on in the news lately.  I have to admit, the term “March Madness” has lived up to its reputation this year in particular from entertainment think (Howard Stern’s comments on ‘Precious’ breakout star and Sandra Bullock’s love woes) to politics Healthcare Reform (nuff said) and everything in between. But I’m happy to report as we Spring into April, (pun intended) Black couples will be marking the eighth annual Black Marriage Day, typically celebrated the 4th weekend in March, by attending workshops, black-tie dinners and other activities. Black Marriage Day founder Nisa Islam Muhammad is encouraging couples to renew their vows in front of friends and family in honor of Perry’s movie premier as well as participate in other planned events centered on celebrating Black love.

Even though my lens still bear the coloring of what I experienced as a child growing up in a single-parent household, I hold onto my convictions that Black love exists, contrary to popular beliefs, and I raise my glass in toast with everyone else celebrating because love – especially Black love – is a many splendid thing I look forward to!

Related News:

Why Did I Get Married Too – Trailer

Jill’s Scott’s Take on Interracial Marriage/Relationships

Black Marriage Day

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